Thank you for the insightful details about South America and the others! Peru, Costa rica sound ideal! Always wanted to work at a sustainable place is Costa Reecs. However, I am also quite interested to know what Brazil , rather the different parts of Brazil are like, since it is so huge would be interesting to visit during the same time of the year.. Since I love and play Capoeira too, I’m pretty tempted to visit Brazil and draw inspiration. 🙂 And what is Colombia like?

Sri Lanka could also be great, and it’s very different. In fact, you might even consider a trip to India itself, which is obviously similar to Sri Lanka. But Sri Lanka is far easier to do in about 12 days, with most of your time spent in the mountains and a bit along the southern coast. Colombo is mainly just good for flying in and getting your bearings. Sri Lanka is also a bit more expensive than Vietnam, but both are great value. And again, you could instead go to Kerala and Goa in India on a short trip, although those are more about relaxation than culture. Let me know if you have any other questions, and I hope this helps. -Roger 

Unfortunately I’ve only been to Cartagena in Colombia, although I know of some travel bloggers who live in Medellin and love it there. The mild weather year round is one reason people love it. I don’t speak much Spanish, which is a problem in much of Latin America, but evidently there is a pretty big scene of various expats and English speakers, so Spanish isn’t so critical. In other words, I like the sound of your idea and I imagine it’ll be great, but I haven’t been there yet so I am really not qualified to give real advice. Best of luck with whatever you choose. -Roger
Australia’s capital has been voted the world’s most livable city—for the seven years in a row. If that isn’t reason enough to go, what is? Here's another: the artsy cosmopolitan city promises pleasant temperatures in the high 60s throughout November. Book a room at one of the area's buzziest spots, QT Melbourne, a design-centric boutique in the city’s fashion district.
As for key events in December, I typically avoid those sorts of things myself, so I’m not a good source on that. I actually visited Rio de Janeiro during Carnival, by accident, and it drives hotel prices so high and also crowds that it’s probably the worst time to visit unless you specifically want to spend all night watching the parades. And Oktoberfest, as another example, literally triples the prices of hotel rooms in Munich, so it’s only worth it if you REALLY want to get involved in the Oktoberfest thing yourself. But plenty of other travelers love to go witness the biggest events, and I assume they love it, so there is no right or wrong.
Those wanting to hike to Machu Picchu will also find this to be an ideal month, since getting in a group will be easy even without much advance notice. The train to Machu Picchu is expensive year round, and reservations should be easier to get the day before this time of the year. Hotels are always cheap in Cusco so you can afford to get something nicer than you are used to this month.
Depending on where you are going on vacation, you may have a measure of control over what you will be eating. For Keto dieters who are staying at a hotel and will be traveling from tourist spot to tourist spot, check with your hotel and see what kind of meal options their restaurant offers or whether there’s a continental breakfast. There may be fewer Keto-friendly options to choose from, but you will likely be able to find something to enjoy. Also, when out traveling, be sure to stop at grocery stores and purchase some Keto-friendly snacks that travel well, such as cured meats or cheeses, which can help keep you from overindulging.
However, I also happen to be an athlete and about a month ago I reached the point where I had almost no power, no energy, constant hunger (and “hanger”) and cravings for practically anything bad like alcohol, sweets, carbs, artificial sweeteners or energy drinks. I tried to fight it. I started over multiple times. At one point I just couldn’t stick to any sensible dietary routine for longer than a day or two. Intermittent fasting, OMAD (one meal a day), TMAD (two meals a day) and keto all seemed to stop working.
It’s no wonder this charming southern city has become an increasingly popular destination over the past few years among domestic and international travelers alike. You’ll find rich history, delicious food, swoon-worthy architecture, and of course—perhaps most importantly—unparalleled southern hospitality. Mild temperatures (think high 60s and low 70s) during the month of November make it an ideal time to visit. While you’re in town, be sure to check out the new South Carolina Historical Society Museum, which opens in September. The building is a National Historic Landmark, and promises to be a major draw for history buffs. There are plenty of great boutique hotels to choose from, but our favorites include 86 Cannon, Zero George, and The Dewberry.

Since you might be open to flying then another nearby option to consider is Siem Reap in Cambodia. It’s a pleasant tourist town on its own, but it only exists as the gateway to the amazing Angkor Wat temples nearby. Those temples are by far the most dramatic and memorable tourist attraction in southeast Asia, and I think your daughters are old enough to appreciate it all. But again, the town of Siem Reap is nice with plenty of other things to do, so it’s a great all around stop.


The Bali thing is also kind of a mess for those on low budgets. Kuta is a headache, and pretty much the opposite of what is so beautiful about the rest of the island, but it’s also where nearly all the really cheap beds are located. If you go a bit north in that same area into Legian and Seminyak, it’s nicer, but prices also go up. And Ubud is nice, but also more expensive for hotels and such. I’ll probably rent a place in Seminyak for a few weeks, which won’t be cheap.


The three places that jump out to me are the Playa del Carmen area just south of Cancun in Mexico, the island of Puerto Rico, or Costa Rica. All of those have endless beach activities and sights and great food and everything else, and they are all well within your budget. Puerto Rico would be easiest, and probably my first choice. Costa Rica is better known for adventure activities that might suit the younger ones. There are several good resort areas along the Pacific coast that would work.
November is a wonderful time to explore this diverse country without the crowds and heat of the summer months. The ancient city of Marrakesh presents an uncommon blend of ancient traditions and modern conveniences. Accommodations include traditional Moroccan houses, or riads, once the homes of upper class Moroccan families. Riads range from budget-friendly room rentals to luxurious palace-like dwellings. Shop the souks or markets of the old city for leather goods, textiles, pottery, spices, and much more. Be prepared to haggle with the vendors for the best prices.
It's getting cold out there, so consider a journey that leads you into a warm museum. Whatever your interest, there's bound to be a specialized one to engage it. If art and sculpture are your passions, discover some favorite art museums around the world. And consider that you can make a day of it soaking up culture as many contain surprisingly good restaurants to visit in between your viewing.
The food, including its famous ceviche dishes, is a particular highlight here, and the tourist district of Miraflores is packed with interesting and cheap restaurants. Basic and cheap hotels are in the same neighborhood, so it's a better alternative to the historic center of Lima for most people. By the way, the rainy season in Cusco starts in December, so the trails can sometimes be cut off, although many people go anyway.
Pretty much everywhere is going to be at or near capacity for those dates because half the world is on Christmas break. Between Australia and New Zealand, I think New Zealand would be far more interesting for 10 to 14 days. In Australia you pretty much have to spend a few days in Sydney, a few days in Melbourne, and a few days at the Great Barrier Reef, all of which require flights and will be very crowded over those weeks.
Flights, on the other hand, can be pricey if you buy too early. My recommendation would be to book a resort soon and then put a fare-alert on the flights so you’ll get an email when the fare drops. For the Caribbean the cheapest fares are usually only 2 or 3 weeks out, and since that is a slow period you really shouldn’t have any problem (unless you are trying to go on popular Thanksgiving dates). Most likely the resort prices won’t change much as November approaches, so you could probably wait on that as well. There will definitely be empty rooms when you get there, so the resorts usually don’t start pushing up rates when they will be partly empty. Best of luck on this. -Roger

Ah, November. The end of the year is nearing, and most of us haven't traveled nearly as much as we planned upon. Thankfully, the second to last month of the year boasts not one, but two, holiday weekends for you to cash in on some of those vacation days and take a little sojourn to somewhere special—with family, with friends, or maybe even your significant other. But where should you go? There are a ton of places where the weather is still warm in November. But if you are looking to cash in on the seasonal appeal, there are also scores of exotic locales which count November as the peak time to travel there (

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