Few people travel between Thanksgiving and Christmas—specifically, from the Tuesday after Thanksgiving to the Thursday or Friday before the peak Christmas rush—so you can enjoy substantial savings off peak-season rates (four nights for the price of three, seven nights for the price of five) and your chances of an upgrade are good—if you book through a Caribbean specialist with clout.
If you are open to Africa you should consider Morocco. It will be a bit chilly in December, but still warm enough to enjoy everything. The culture there is fascinating and it’s also very tourist-friendly and safe. I think it would be cheaper for you to fly to Morocco than to the Americas, and the daily costs are very reasonable as well. Those should give you some things to think about, and feel free to follow up if you have other questions.

It’ll definitely be too chilly in Portugal or Malta to go in the water in November, and Malta has almost no beaches anyway. I really like Malta a lot, but it’s not a great beach destination. It will be warm enough in the Canary Islands, but the flight from Atlanta would be long and expensive because you have to change planes in Madrid. Also, I find the Canary Islands to be pleasant and the weather is wonderful, but it’s kind of boring there compared to the other places we are discussing.
Picking your next destination isn’t easy, but there’s a better way than spinning a big globe, closing your eyes and slamming your finger down (it’ll probably end up in middle of the Atlantic, and wifi there is patchy to say the least). Introducing our ultimate month-by-month destination guide: your no-fuss list of places to go, things to see, and good weather to chase around the world.
But if you wanted more to explore the area near Singapore then Malaysia and Thailand are the obvious choices. The three most popular stops in Malaysia are Malacca, Kuala Lumpur, and George Town on the island of Penang. I quite like all of those so it’s hard to recommend one over another. I really like Kuala Lumpur and have spent quite a bit of time there, but honestly compared to Singapore it seems a bit untidy and old fashioned. In other words, if you are tired of a big and busy city like Singapore, then don’t plan much time in KL. Malacca and George Town are both smaller tourist cities with great food and interesting sights. There is frequent and cheap bus service from Singapore going through Malacca and onto KL. Then more buses from there to Penang and onto Bangkok.
Ethiopia is known as the Roof of Africa, and dry November, with the countryside still verdant from the recent rains, is the perfect time to plan a trek in the Simien Mountains, a dramatic plateau that’s home to endemic wildlife – from walia ibex to gelada monkeys. Equally mesmerising landscapes are on offer in Northern Thailand, where hiking trails that thread through waterlogged rice paddies to waterfalls and hilltop stilt villages are even more special without the selfie-snapping summer crowds.

The mountains of Canada include the gentle slopes of Mont Tremblant in the east to the towering ones of Whistler in the west. Note that Canadians celebrate their Thanksgiving before the United States does, which makes our neighbor to the north a particularly good place for couples who won't be visiting family during that U.S. holiday—especially if you're willing to forgo turkey and stuffing for crepes and poutine.
Hmmm…this is a tricky one. Since you want to get out of SEA, you might have to go a long way to reach someplace that could be considered cheap and also has decent weather in December. Japan and South Korea will be cold, and not really cheap. If you go south you hit Australia, which is very expensive by most SEA standards (although not bad by Singapore standards). Perth is obviously closest and it’s a real city, and of course Sydney and Melbourne will be in early summer in December so those could work if your budget allows. Brisbane and Cairns are both known for outdoor activities, although nightlife might be tough for teenagers and there are no real cultural sights.
Even though November is one of the busy months in Pokhara, they've built so many new hotels in the past few years that finding a room – even at a decent price – should always be possible. The high-season rates are still very cheap by almost anyone else's standards, and food and drinks are always very affordable, but if you look around a bit you'll be able to do even better.
Costa Rica is kind of the Thailand of Latin America in that they have great tourist infrastructure and it’s the easiest place to get around. They also have a lot to offer with the beaches on both coasts and many natural sights and activities, plus of course the Arenal volcano, which is a really nice area. San Jose is best as a place to just pass through on your way somewhere else.
The rainy season is over so it's an ideal time to base yourself in Chiang Mai for some outdoor activities in the area. There are temples like crazy in the city center between the old walls, but even more interesting ones in the area just around Chiang Mai. There's also great trekking and such, available quite affordably from any travel agency in the city.
Pretty much everywhere is going to be at or near capacity for those dates because half the world is on Christmas break. Between Australia and New Zealand, I think New Zealand would be far more interesting for 10 to 14 days. In Australia you pretty much have to spend a few days in Sydney, a few days in Melbourne, and a few days at the Great Barrier Reef, all of which require flights and will be very crowded over those weeks.

The second trip will be the second week of December from the 13th to the 19th. Also warm place with adventure and tourism. Im going with my best friend. I was thinking one of the islands of the Caribbean or Latin America ( since I can travel freely to most of them without the process of getting a visa) but I’m not sure which ones where not affected by Irma.
My family and I are planning our first trip to Europe for the last week of December (2018) and the first week of January (2019), I know this is a long way off but I am a planner and to me that is half the fun! I know to most people that time of year in Europe is not ideal, but we LOVE cold weather, snow, rain, etc. and I am drawn to the lower prices and smaller crowds. So far I am considering Rome for 6 nights, Venice for 2 and Munich for 6 nights. I want to take day trips from Rome to see Pompeii & the Amalfi Coast and from Munich to see Rothenburg and Nuremburg. Does this seem like a good itinerary? Since I love the cold weather are there any other itineraries you think would be ideal for that time of year? Any advice you have would be very much appreciated.
A trip to glittering New York City during the holiday season is exciting, and it’s the perfect place to finish gift shopping while enjoying the festive atmosphere. Ice skating under Rockefeller Center’s fabulous Christmas tree and watching the high-kicking Rockettes are holiday traditions for New Yorkers and visitors alike. Or come at the end of the month for an unforgettable New Year’s Eve watching the ball drop among the crowd in Times Square. If a little bit of country is more your style, you’ll love Austin in December. Whether you travel far or stay close to home, a December trip can be the perfect gift to yourself.
It looks like you’ve been to most of the more popular options for winter holidays already, and since you listed them I assume you want to go somewhere new. The one that is missing, which I think could be perfect for you, is the Guanacaste area in northern Costa Rica. The weather will be perfect and you should be able to get a reasonably priced flight into nearby Liberia Airport. There are a variety of smaller towns along those beaches, and Tamarindo might be the most famous. They offer a mix of traditional hotels and resorts in smaller towns along with newer 4-star and 5-star hotels on large properties that tend to be away from the towns. The weather will obviously be similar to Panama, as long as you were on the west coast. Costa Rica is the adventure capital of Latin America and one-third of the country is national parks, so there is plenty to see and do. There isn’t much history there, but you can’t have everything.

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On the hunt for a non-traditional ski vacation? Look no further than the Japanese Alps. According to American Express Travel, the region has seen an increase in bookings during the holidays in recent years. And while December has historically been less popular than Japan’s peak season—April-November—adventurous travelers are now intrigued by the wilderness of Japan in the winter. The Hida, Kiso, and Akaishi alps are home to indigenous snow monkeys, volcanoes, and lava plateaus, plus, visitors are drawn to the area for its pristine ski offerings, natural hot springs, and rural hiking.
The biggest single highlight in the region is the Angkor Wat temples near Siem Reap in Cambodia. It’s one of the most impressive tourist sights in the entire world, and Siem Reap is a fun and mellow town that you can linger in for a while. Vietnam is really lovely and cheap as well. The food there is excellent, as it’s a fusion of French and traditional Asian. You can go from Ho Chi Minh City in the south on the train to Hoi An near Da Nang, and then up to Hanoi to see Halong Bay. I wouldn’t start in Vietnam because it can be a bit trickier than the others. In the rest of the region it’s easy to book tours and buses and such, but in Vietnam the travel agencies are a bit harder to trust, so you have to be more careful. Things there are very cheap though, so even if you pay more for a reputable agency, it’ll still be cheap.
As for flight connections, Barcelona and Madrid should have decent connections to Toronto and Delhi, while Casablanca (Morocco’s largest airport) probably does not. So Spain is the better choice by that standard. On the other hand, you can get to Morocco by ferry from Spain in a short time, so you could go to Spain and also visit Morocco for a day or two.
Cambodia could work because Siem Reap is inland and the amazing Angkor Wat temples are worth a full day or two, and the town of Siem Reap itself is quite nice. You could actually combine a couple days in Siem Reap with a few days in Bangkok, and take a (cheap) luxury bus between the two. Bangkok is a really fascinating city with a lot to see, plus it’s a great transport hub. The other main non-beach option in Thailand is the city of Chiang Mai, which is wonderfully inexpensive with quite a bit to see. It’s even a bit cool during December, so that might be a nice change of pace from India. Many people are also going to Myanmar these days, although I haven’t been yet so it’s hard for me to recommend it. I’d say if you combined 2 or even 3 of these places you could have a very interesting holiday.
I too am a planner, which is how I got involved in this, and so I totally understand your motivation. I think your plan sounds quite good. The weather in the places you are planning is actually fairly mild, and none of them are too far north. For some of us it’s easy to forget how far north parts of Europe are, and in those areas it’s not so much the cold but the fact that the sun rises at 10am and sets at 3pm that time of the year.
It’s no wonder this charming southern city has become an increasingly popular destination over the past few years among domestic and international travelers alike. You’ll find rich history, delicious food, swoon-worthy architecture, and of course—perhaps most importantly—unparalleled southern hospitality. Mild temperatures (think high 60s and low 70s) during the month of November make it an ideal time to visit. While you’re in town, be sure to check out the new South Carolina Historical Society Museum, which opens in September. The building is a National Historic Landmark, and promises to be a major draw for history buffs. There are plenty of great boutique hotels to choose from, but our favorites include 86 Cannon, Zero George, and The Dewberry.

Get acquainted with San Antonio on a River Walk boat tour as you pass restaurants, shops, historic architecture, and the Museum Reach, a 1.3-mile section with art installations and native landscaping. November weather, in the mid-60s, makes outdoor activities comfortable for exploring the city and enjoying the month’s events. November begins with Dia de los Muertos, the traditional Mexican holiday that remembers those who have passed away. Music, processions, performances, and costumed dancers will pay tribute in Pearl Park (Nov. 1-2) and Market Square (Nov. 3-4).


Thank you. I think Kauai, Cancun, and Costa Rica could all be good choices for you. You’ll be looking at the last month (more or less) of the rainy season in each of them, but in the Tropics that usually means at most a few quick thunderstorms per week that typically last only 30 minutes or so. Kauai would be the most expensive of the three, although the most beautiful as well, and the easiest to visit since Spanish isn’t necessary at all.
While Cancun has become the king of the Mexican beach resort towns in the few decades since it was formed, it's only one of many, and all of them on both coasts have very nice weather in December. In fact, Cancun is probably the most expensive of them, so especially if you are coming from the west coast you are better off in Puerto Vallarta, Acapulco, or Los Cabos instead.
Really my first bit of advice is that the best place to get a really nice hotel that is on a beach or a hill and has the other nearby and also has great weather in December is Phuket, Thailand. You could go almost anywhere in southeast Asia in December and get good weather and low prices. But Phuket has over 1,000 hotels and hundreds of those are wonderful fairly luxurious hotels or villa complexes that could be perfect for a romantic honeymoon stay.
I’m happy to try to help. It’s hard to say whether one 30-day trip would be better than several shorter trips. On one hand, it’s much more efficient to go for a month because it obviously saves you all the going back and forth. Also, one week is a short time to go 7 or 8 time zones away, as it takes pretty much an entire day each way, and at least a few days to adjust to the time change. Hmmm…
If your real goal is to sit on a European beach and not freeze or be alone in December, your only real choice is the Canary Islands. Tenerife is the largest of them, and the best one for English speakers. The average high in December there is 22C with 16C as a low, and in December it’s packed with Swedes and Brits and Germans who actually do sit on the beach or around pools, even though it’s a bit cool for most of us. It’s important to note though that the Canary Islands are technically part of Europe because they are a territory of Spain, but only the largest cities on each island are “European” at all. The beach resort areas are quite generic, and not very special aside from the pleasant weather and modest prices.
I think a side trip or two will be a great idea. Singapore is a large and very interesting city, but you can see everything that you want in maybe 3 days or so. You have almost limitless options if you include the possibility of a flight. Even though Singapore itself (especially hotels) is kind of expensive, you can get cheap flights to all points of Asia from there, and the airport is awesome. Air Asia and Tiger are two great low-cost airlines with many flights out of Singapore, so you could check their destinations and find something good.
The mountains of Canada include the gentle slopes of Mont Tremblant in the east to the towering ones of Whistler in the west. Note that Canadians celebrate their Thanksgiving before the United States does, which makes our neighbor to the north a particularly good place for couples who won't be visiting family during that U.S. holiday—especially if you're willing to forgo turkey and stuffing for crepes and poutine.
Keep Snacks Handy When You are Out – This was my snack stash for Disney World. I had Macadamia Nuts, Walnuts, Pecans, and low carb bars. I made sure to chill the water bottles in the freezer beforehand so that as they thawed throughout the day, we had cold water. When hunger hit, instead of falling to temptation, I just grabbed my bag of snacks before I got HANGRY. Doing so made it so much easier to make keto/low carb choices at mealtime. I kept my snacks simple because we already had enough to bring with us (if you have a baby and a toddler you know what I mean). I saw lots of people with small coolers who were snacking on fresh veggies and deli meats, but, again, my goal was easy breezy. You can find a great list of Keto/Low Carb Snack ideas here for inspiration if you prefer a variety.

I’m in the Texas Hill Country myself at the moment (Kerrville to be exact), so we are almost neighbors. It really depends on whether you’d like a city or a beach or national parks and such. My first recommendation is Mexico City. You’ll be able to get cheap flights from Dallas, and the weather there in November is very nice and dry. Honestly, the whole huge city center is as nice as any large Texas city, and the architecture is far more interesting. You can even visit some pyramids just a bit outside of town. Before I went I assumed Mexico City would look run-down like many border towns, but it’s actually very fancy.

Last month we had a week long vacation to Sardinia. You can watch the vlog here. I managed to stay keto the entire vacation, without too much effort. It was quite easy to stay keto actually. I did give myself a talking to before we came and I decided that I was going to do a totally keto vacation to show you guy that it absolutely can be done.  I thought that I was going to fail at the first hurdle when we got to the lounge in the airport. It was all carbs.

If that doesn’t interest you I would point you towards the Playa del Carmen area, which is just south of Cancun and just across the strait from Cozumel. November is technically the last month of hurricane season and early in the month you’ll probably get at least a few quick rain storms, but actual hurricane in November are very rare. And at least Playa del Carmen is on the mainland and near a huge airport, so tourists would never be trapped there as they might on some small islands. Playa del Carmen is a fairly large touristy town with hundreds of little hotels, restaurants, bars, and things to do, so it’s good for a solo visit or with another person. Cancun proper, on the other hand, is mainly a long strip of beach hotels and time-share residences that are spread out and not well suited to solo visitors or small groups.
Otherwise the big draws are the Great Barrier Reef, which is obviously focused on diving, snorkeling, and water activities, so it may not be too interesting, and Uluru, which is the big rock in the center of the country (and not near anything else of interest). There is also wine regions in the south near Sydney, and of course nature parks to see kangaroos and the other indigenous animals.
The subtropical climate of Hong Kong means that summers are particularly hot and wet, and spring is warm and humid. November is the sweet spot, with clear, sunny days and mild temperatures. During your trip, you'll want to take a traditional junk boat ride on the harbour (seen here) and check out the sweeping city views from Victoria Peak, which you can reach by tram. Another can't miss? Stockton, a hidden speakeasy-style whiskey bar in Central.
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