Bali, which is just south of the equator, would be a good choice in November. It does rain a bit that month, but they are summer storms that tend to only last 30 minutes or so. It’s a wonderful island with great prices on most things, including massages. The complicated thing about Bali is that the main tourist areas of Kuta, Legian, and Seminyak are now so crowded that they can be unpleasant. I spent a month there again earlier this year, and I don’t think I’ll go back to that part of the island.
Thailand is far more different and it’s easier to get around. The tourist areas are quite modern and well organized, and enough people speak English that it’s easy to do whatever you like. Again there you have choices of cooler areas in the north such as Chiang Mai, and of course Bangkok, as well as all of the islands. Let me know if you have any questions. -Roger
That is an interesting request. I’ve spent about 18 total months in those countries you mention and I’ve yet to see a single rat. If your fear of rats is just that, you could go to any of them. But if you have a more general fear of things that are untidy then I’d definitely avoid India. It’s a fascinating country, but there are piles of garbage all over the place.
My second vacation meal was dinner that night. After walking almost ten miles at the park, the hotel, and spending the late afternoon swimming in the pool, we did dinner at the hotel restaurant before heading back to the park to ride a few things one last time. Dinner (Meal 2) consisted of pot roast with carrots and mushrooms (I asked them to go light on my carrots and they did a very good job of it), and a side salad that I again topped with salt, pepper, and blue cheese dressing.
Fortunately, it rarely rains at all in Cairo, so even though December is one of the wetter months, that means nothing and you are unlikely to see even a drop of rain. Hotel prices do reach their peak in Cairo starting late in December, so it's best to go early in the month if possible. Egypt is definitely one of the cheapest places to travel in December, and the weather is surprisingly nice as well.
Thank you for the helpful comment. Interestingly enough, I’m in Tenerife at the moment (for a month). I probably will add Tenerife when I update the November list in a couple months, and I already have it listed in much of the year on the other lists. But calling this place “Europe” is a bit of a stretch. There are islands in the Caribbean run by France, Netherlands, and Britain that are also full territories of those countries, and you could just as easily call those “Europe” using the same definition. Still, I appreciate you taking the time to comment. -Roger
Thank you. I think Kauai, Cancun, and Costa Rica could all be good choices for you. You’ll be looking at the last month (more or less) of the rainy season in each of them, but in the Tropics that usually means at most a few quick thunderstorms per week that typically last only 30 minutes or so. Kauai would be the most expensive of the three, although the most beautiful as well, and the easiest to visit since Spanish isn’t necessary at all.

Don’t let the last weeks of fall pass by without getting one last glimpse of the season’s best colors by taking a road trip along the Blue Ridge Parkway to enjoy a look at fine fall foliage in Virginia. It’s always around November time when the vibrant bloom of changing leaves begins to lose their glow, so take in a spectacle of brilliant warm autumn hues before the snow starts falling by heading out to Central or Eastern Virginia.

Hey Roger. My girlfriend and I are planning to go during Christmas for 13 days from San Diego, CA to South America mainly on the west side. We are not up for beaches but rather historical, adventurous, and scenic places. We are keen on Cusco (Peru) (Inca Trail), Quito (Ecuador), Costa Rica (Rain Forest), Bogota (Columbia). Please can you help us with your expert advice on which cities are a must for first timers to South America. We are not picky and simply want to have a fun time. Thank you for your time.


Located just 90 minutes from New York City, the quaint Caribbean island is home to fantastic beaches—like the famed Horseshoe Bay and Elbow Beach—plus a unique style all its own. A balanced mix of charming British heritage and laid-back tropical vibes, Bermuda has, in recent years, become a hotspot over the holidays. The weather is typically temperate (expect temperatures in the 70s) which makes it a perfect destination for golf-lovers, families, and anyone looking for a quick weekend escape.
Lastly, while you’re stocking up on your morning coffee or mid-morning snack, you can many times see hard boiled eggs, snack-size cheeses, and small packs of nuts available in the display cases. While this is common in gas stations and convenience stores, more and more coffee shops and cafés are offering elevated versions of these as well. These are a quick and easy way to get some keto food while you’re sightseeing or running to a meeting.
While it's true that it might be a stretch to call Cusco's November weather “great,” this is perhaps the best month of the year to visit, and the weather is quite good anyway. The high season for hotels in Cusco ends in October, yet the rainy season doesn't begin until late December, so November is that perfect combination of small crowds, low prices, and very good weather.
“Winter in Eastern Canada” might sound more like a 19th-century prison sentence than it does a pleasant vacation, but Quebec City does the cold better than anywhere in North America. Blanketed in snow, QC looks like the world’s most elaborately constructed Christmas village. The cobblestone streets in Old Quebec densely packed with storefronts beckoning you to come in for hot food and baked goods, and boisterous bars overflow with a cacophony of Quebecoise. In December the streets are draped with Christmas wreaths and populated with carolers, plus there’s an authentic German Christmas market -- a true novelty in a city so overwhelmingly French.

Not all the extra ingredients are keto friendly. Some of the dressing mixes are high in carbs as well as some of the extra ingredients such as tortilla strips and croutons. Depending upon how many carbs you eat in a day you may want to avoid those mixes, or at least remove some of the ingredients, and stick with the mixes that only contain salad greens.
Today, we’re looking at November, typically seen as a funny month for travel given the impending holiday silly season in December. But here’s a secret: while everyone else is busy counting down the days until their Christmas break, you could be off exploring everywhere from Croatia to Patagonia, with glorious weather and none of the crowds. Sound too good to be true? Read on to discover where to go for your perfect November getaway.
Ah December, the last—and arguably busiest—month of the year. With just 31 days to spare until a new year, plenty of holidays to celebrate, and hopefully, some time off from work, it is more than optimal to take a trip. But where? With plenty of regions around the globe warm and toasty, while others are frosty and festive, the list of where to go is simply endless. But whether you fancy a tropical getaway or are yearning to cash in on the chilly charm of the season, we've pulled together the best places to visit in December 2019, from mountain excursions in Wyoming to jaunts in the Japanese Alps—and even an enticing trip to the Maldives. No matter where your heart desires to go, surely we've found it. Read on for the 12 places you should visit in December 2019.
My favorite part of Bali is now the area around Lovina along the north coast, which is still very mellow and mostly open spaces with light development. It’s really beautiful and there is plenty to do. You can get similar experiences by visiting the nearby Gili islands, which also feel like Bali used to be 20 years ago when it was much nicer. They are all really beautiful and relaxing islands with great scenery and very friendly people. You just need to steer clear of the places that are the most crowded.
Those countries are all very safe, and especially that time of year, you’ll be surrounded by dozens of other backpackers everywhere you go, including many solo ladies or girls in pairs. There is very little petty crime there, although it’s always wise to keep track of your belongings. It’ll be easy once you get there, and Bangkok is the perfect place to start. You can book a place near the famous “backpacker ghetto” of Khao San Road, which is quite affordable and really fun, as well as close to the top sights.
There are always those travelers who celebrate the end of summer and the opportunity to don a sweater and take out the wool scarves and quilted jackets. For them, Iceland would be a perfect destination, with a chance to see the Northern Lights and adorable sled dogs. Montreal is another place with a winter chill, and at the end of the month, you might even find an early Christmas market. San Antonio gets into the holiday spirit at the end of November as well. Sedona offers chilly nights and gorgeous scenery, while Hilton Head Island still enjoys autumn weather and activities.

If you are going to that region I suggest you visit a site called travelfish.org, which is by far the best website on SE Asia and it’s run by a friend of mine who lives in Bali. They have busy forums where you can ask questions and quickly get them answered by experts on every imaginable topic there. I’m happy to help more as you are planning, so let me know if you have any other questions. -Roger


My partner and I (in our 20s) are thinking about where to travel next December. We are from Australia, and since our last 2 trips have been to cold places (US and Japan) we are looking for a warm place to head to next. We aren’t into partying and I would love somewhere with nice beaches, wildlife and rainforests, but my partner can get easily bored so we need some activities and civilisation too. Probably looking at around 2-4 weeks depending on how much there is to see and do and would like to spend $100-200 AUD per night accommodation. Also, would like to feel safe wherever we end up.
As for Malaysia, you could book online and it might cost a bit more, but more things go by a fixed price in Malaysia so it might not be much different. Personally I’d probably book tours through my hotel once I got there, just as in Vietnam. But there is a BIG difference between the countries in that Malaysia is a much richer country and there are very few scams to worry about. Vietnam is still fairly poor and they were communist for so long that people got used to trying to scam people a bit as the only way of getting ahead. So the good news is that Vietnam is a gorgeous country with excellent food and very low prices on almost everything. But the bad news is that you have to be more careful in Vietnam because people will try to overcharge you if they can, even though it still might seem cheap to you. That’s one reason I like to book with hotels, because they put the reputation of the hotel on the line when they book something for you, and they can’t afford to get a string of bad reviews by charging an extra US$5 on a cut-rate tour. I hope this helps. Let me know if you have any other questions. -Roger
Turkey has bars all over Istanbul and the other tourist cities, but there are also cafes and tea shops and that sort of thing that are filled with locals (and some tourists) all evening. In Dubai and Abu Dhabi, the only bars are attached to hotels (and there are a LOT of them), but almost no locals drink, so there are unlimited evening alternatives. Other nearby Muslim countries such as Oman and Bahrain are similar, except with far fewer tourists (and drinkers).

I’ve done most of my travel as a solo, and I’m now a couple years older than you, so I know exactly what you are asking about. If you had even 2 full weeks I’d suggest going to southeast Asia, but as you say, the travel time could be a killer for a shorter trip. Still, it’s a unique experience with a lot of positive aspects to it, so you should keep it in mind. If you are still considering it, I’d suggest flying to Bangkok for 4 days or so, and then spend the rest of your time on one of the islands such as Kho Samui or Phuket. If you want more information on that, let me know.
Reading through your wonderful comments- looking for Xmas for 6 people that have travelled extensively. Caribbean now is “out” and still fear zika since my kids are in their 30s- or do you think zika is a scare of the past? Uruguay has been on our radar and so i thought it interesting that you had a recent comment. Galapagos is filled. Maldives? Do you think Cuba is still an option after Irma and with current US relations? Thanks
Being from Mumbai you can be forgiven for not realizing how unappealing beach areas are when the air temperatures are only a bit above freezing. Seriously, even beach on the European mainland is totally deserted by November 1, and many of the local hotels and restaurants are closed by then until April or so. Now, if you are mainly after the novelty of being on a beach in the European winter, you can certainly go and still find open hotels and restaurants. If I had to recommend one place to consider it would be Spain’s Costa del Sol, which is the resort area around Malaga. The average high in December in Malaga is 17, and the average low is 8. You’d be the only one on the beach, which might be kind of nice. It’ll also probably be windy. If you were going to do that I’d recommend staying in Malaga itself, which does have a nice beach area in the city, and since it’s a city the hotels and restaurants will all be going.
I totally agree about the solo traveling thing being down to luck in many cases. Right now I’m on a long trip around Europe again, and from one night to the next I might meet a bunch of interesting people, or be sitting there alone in a sea of locals with no interest in chatting with foreigners. At least in a place like Goa, everybody is on holiday, so I’ve had good luck meeting people.
As for alternatives you might consider Argentina, where of course it will be late spring in November. Buenos Aires is a wonderful city and recently they’ve been going through a financial meltdown again so their currency has dropped a lot, making things unusually cheap again. You could spend 3 or 4 days in Buenos Aires and the rest in the Mendoza wine country or Iguazu Falls or Bariloche for some adventure. From everything I have heard it’s all safe and civil there, so it’s just a matter of the local currency going down in value.
Even when those quick rain storms come, you can see them forming and head indoors for a while. Nearly every hotel on Boracay is on the beach or within 200 meters of the beach, so it’s really easy to stay dry. If you stay along White Beach (where most hotels are) I think it would be easy to meet other people if you choose as well. Let me know if you have any other questions. -Roger
Pay homage to the Native American heritage of the U S of A by taking in the sights and sounds of Arizona’s capital city for pure rest and relaxation before the holiday season. Phoenix anchors a sprawling, multicity metropolitan area known as the Valley of the Sun, which is highly regarded for its luxury resorts, vibrant nightclubs, designer golf courses, and long lasting sunshine and warmth—even through the winter months. Attractions include the Heard Museum and the Pueblo Grande Museum & Archaeological Park. Be sure to check them out!
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