The 2nd option is a bit early in the year. The Greek Islands are cold and mostly deserted until mid April or so, and the good weather really starts in May or June. This is true in Mallorca as well. The Canary Islands are much farther south so they have acceptable beach weather almost all year, although you might get some cooler days in March as well. Even still I wouldn’t really recommend them for a younger person. In my opinion, the Canary Islands are pretty boring because the majority of visitors that time of year will be retired people from northern Europe who just want to sit in the sun. The nightlife tends to be cheesy and/or weak if you can find it at all. Let me know if you have any other questions. -Roger
That’s an interesting question. On my main list of Caribbean destinations ranked from cheapest to most expensive, I have a list of the 6 islands that suffered heavy damage and are not going to be open for normal business this coming winter. But that leaves 26 other destinations on the list where things are totally normal. Fortunately for the industry in general, the busiest destinations such as Jamaica, Dominican Republic, and the Cancun area, are all still unscathed.
A charming, historic city to visit any time of year, Edinburgh is especially festive during December. Walking through its cobblestone streets takes you back to medieval days when sheep, cattle, and grain were sold in what is now the center of the city. Today, the Royal Mile includes shops, cafes, and museums. Edinburgh Castle, a must for first-time visitors, dates to the 12th century, with its dramatic silhouette overlooking the city. For those seeking holiday celebrations, the Royal Botanic Garden is decorated with lights, music, and illuminated trees. European-style Christmas markets pop up at Princes Street Gardens and George Street, offering traditional crafts, gifts, food, and warming drinks, most welcome during chilly December. The annual Hogmanay celebration welcomes the New Year with fireworks, food, and festivities. Don’t miss the delicious and ubiquitous fish chowder called “Cullen skink,” and be sure to try haggis, served with “neeps and tatties” — mashed turnips and potatoes. Buttery shortbread and whisky from the country’s more than 100 distilleries are also Scottish specialties. A stay at the elegant and historic Balmoral Hotel will enhance any visit to Edinburgh, and while you’re there, you’ll notice that Scottish actor Sean Connery was a guest, as was J. K. Rowling who finished the last Harry Potter book in one of its suites.
I think Spain is probably your best bet, and you can probably get there on a reasonably priced flight with a change in Dubai or Abu Dhabi. The winter weather is decent and the big cities are always packed with locals rather than so many tourists. Barcelona is probably more fun than Madrid, though both are big cities with a lot to see and notoriously good nightlife. If you get a cheap enough flight I don’t think you need to do a package. It’s pretty easy to get around Spain’s big cities just on English, as long as you do a bit of research. In 5 days you could spend 3 days in Barcelona and then 2 days in Madrid, or just 5 days in the Barcelona area. It’s a big city with plenty to see and some good day trips. You could also go to Valencia, which is also really fun and a short train ride away.
On my own trip I spent 3 nights on the North Island after leaving Auckland, and then 4 nights on the South Island. The South Island is more scenic and interesting, and much less crowded, so I would have liked to have stayed another 2 or 3 nights if I had the time. So I’d recommend 3 or 4 nights on the North Island and 5 to 7 nights on the South Island. With smaller towns and smaller crowds on the South Island, that is the better place for star gazing, though most of the North Island is fairly empty as well. It’s an amazing place and I’m sure you’ll love it. Have a great trip. -Roger
Thank you. If you want a sunny destination that is affordably reachable from Germany in November, the Canary Islands is the obvious choice. Tenerife is the largest and easiest to visit, and it’ll be warm enough to sunbathe and everything else in November if you stay in the area in the southwest of the island around Los Cristianos or Playa de las Americas. The “culture” around there will be a small mix of locals and a larger mix of people from northern Europe, so it’s interesting, although not as authentic as some prefer. Still, for great weather and great prices in November, it’s your best choice.
The same resort that charges US$300 per night in January will usually go for US$200 per night in November, especially earlier in the month. And this goes for all-inclusive resorts as well, which start at US$116 per night for two people in the low season when we last looked. If your main goal is relaxation in a perfect climate, Punta Cana is probably the best value in the entire hemisphere. And if you are wondering where to go in November for a beach all-inclusive then this is your best choice.
My other two suggestions are San Juan, Puerto Rico and Cartagena, Colombia. Both cities have really wonderful colonial districts and modern resort districts nearby. San Juan is more expensive, but still reasonable, and it has far better beaches. Both have a bit of rain in November, but it tends to come and go quickly. You’ll get similar rainstorms in most of the Caribbean in November, so it’s a bit tricky. I hope this helps. If you had something else in mind let me know and I’ll try again. -Roger 

Hi Roger, What a great list! Answers to this question may not involve “great” weather. My 40+ yo boyfriend has never been outside the US (!) while I’ve traveled a bit (France, Spain, Italy, Greece, Iceland, Lebanon, E/W Canada, Mexico) and he’d rather go somewhere we both haven’t. We’re in Richmond VA and we’ll be travelling 11/22 – 26 this year. We love being outdoors and solo adventuring, don’t mind putting on rain jackets and lightly hiking/biking around old sites in 50-80 degree F weather; we enjoy delicious cuisine in hole-in-the-wall restaurants and staying in quirky hostels/Airbnb but also spending at least one day being tourons on a big red bus if available. Any ideas in eastern/western Europe? He’s really looking forward to going there. Thanks!
I haven’t followed the Zika list, but I do understand the concern. Since you aren’t big beach people, you might just bring jackets and go to a more romantic city like Paris, and then maybe down to Nice for part of the trip and something a bit different. I’m not sure if this is helping, but if you have any questions about any of this I’m happy to keep trying. -Roger

The Bali thing is also kind of a mess for those on low budgets. Kuta is a headache, and pretty much the opposite of what is so beautiful about the rest of the island, but it’s also where nearly all the really cheap beds are located. If you go a bit north in that same area into Legian and Seminyak, it’s nicer, but prices also go up. And Ubud is nice, but also more expensive for hotels and such. I’ll probably rent a place in Seminyak for a few weeks, which won’t be cheap.


It's getting cold out there, so consider a journey that leads you into a warm museum. Whatever your interest, there's bound to be a specialized one to engage it. If art and sculpture are your passions, discover some favorite art museums around the world. And consider that you can make a day of it soaking up culture as many contain surprisingly good restaurants to visit in between your viewing.
For a cheap destination in December that has great clothes shopping opportunities I can only think of two really good options. The closer of the two is Dubai. I’m not sure if you’ve been there before, but it has some of the best shopping in the world with every store imaginable and very good prices because duties and taxes are low. In spite of its reputation, Dubai can actually be visited quite cheaply if that is important. It’s famous for expensive hotels, but it’s got hundreds of more affordable hotels that can be pretty nice.
If you’re lucky enough to have a Farmer’s Market in the city you’re visiting – give it a try! They usually have vendors there that really take pride in what they’re making. You can get some beautiful farm-to-table meat and freshly picked vegetables right from the farmer themselves. It makes for a great experience, and gives you some fantastic product to eat.
Back in 2008, we asked chef Stephanie Kimmel from Eugene's Marche restaurant to take a stab at updating Thanksgiving's well-worn green bean casserole -- you know the one we're talking about, with the canned beans and mushroom soup, topped with fried onions. Kimmel's from-scratch version features colorful fresh green beans that are baked in a homemade white sauce that tastes cleaner than the 1950s tinned three-can combo. If Thanksgiving dinner doesn't feel complete without a green bean casserole, this is the one to make!
Hi Maria, Intermittent fasting is absolutely good for the Mitochondria. Keto diet should not be followed for long stretches of time due to the way long-term keto is affecting your body. Short periods of Keto is fine. As for mitochondria repair, diet, sleep, and exercise are absolutely key to making the mitochondria stronger and maintain their health. However, there are a lot of factors that are impacting your mitochondria so you cannot rely on diet, exercise, and sleep alone. Ari

I think the best place for what you want is Thailand. You can choose from Phuket or Ko Samui or one of many other islands, and they all have nice beaches and good nightlife at a very reasonable price. There are other places in Asia that have warm December weather, but Thailand’s tourist infrastructure is better than the others so it’s just much easier to get around and do what you want. Let me know if you have any other questions. -Roger
If you are looking for first-rate destinations that are among the cheaper European cities, I’ll suggest Prague, Budapest, Krakow, and Berlin. You could visit all four of them by taking trains, or choose any one, two, or three. In December you can get quite a nice room in any of those cities, with Berlin being the most expensive by a bit. Food and attractions are also quite affordable in those cities. 

Increasingly popular, Lisbon is quite warm in summer, but November’s cooler temperatures and fewer crowds make it a pleasant time to visit. A city of hills and spectacular views, many terraces (miradouros) offer vistas for those who climb (or take a taxi) to the top. Alfama is the city’s historic district, defined by hilly, narrow cobblestone streets. The Fado Museum, in Alfama, honors Portugal’s soulful folk music and provides some background on the sounds heard nightly in the city’s fado houses and bars. Seafood is plentiful in Lisbon, and the traditional Portuguese dried salted cod (bacalhau) is on most menus along with octopus, shrimp, sardines, clams, and tuna.
If you are open to Africa you should consider Morocco. It will be a bit chilly in December, but still warm enough to enjoy everything. The culture there is fascinating and it’s also very tourist-friendly and safe. I think it would be cheaper for you to fly to Morocco than to the Americas, and the daily costs are very reasonable as well. Those should give you some things to think about, and feel free to follow up if you have other questions.

New Zealand will also be crowded, but the country is otherwise mostly empty so it is still wonderful. You could fly to Auckland for one day or so and rent a campervan/motorhome. Drive it for 3 or so days on the North Island, and then onto the ferry to the South Island for the rest of your time. The South Island is far more scenic and less crowded. You’ll be doing some driving and looking, but after a few hours of that you can stop at a campground and have plenty of things to do such as hiking or water sports and much more.
As for Malaysia, I’m a big fan, and with your friend there it should be easy. Interestingly, I was just in China myself recently and a few days ago I published a long article on my advice for whether to go yourself to China or go on a group tour. I also discuss the most popular and best places to visit when you are there in the bottom part of the article. One tricky thing for many of us is that you have to get a China travel visa and some of us can only get that visa issued in our home country, at least according to their rules. I literally spent years traveling around Asia but I was never able to visit China because they required that I get a visa issued in the US and I had to show my flights booked from the US to China and then from China back to the US. If I could have gotten a visa issued at a Chinese embassy in Bangkok or Singapore, I would have done it years ago.
You’ve been to Cancun, but have you been to Playa del Carmen? Personally I much prefer it because PdC is a lovely tourist town with hundreds of little hotels and restaurants and bars, unlike Cancun, which is mainly a long string of high-rise beach hotels that are so spread out that you are nearly trapped in your own hotel. It’s about an hour south of Cancun airport by taxi or shuttle. That would be another of your cheaper options, partly because flights into Cancun are pretty cheap. It will be the tail-end of the rainy season in all of these places, but that usually just means a 30-minute rain storm a few afternoons each week.
I’m in the Texas Hill Country myself at the moment (Kerrville to be exact), so we are almost neighbors. It really depends on whether you’d like a city or a beach or national parks and such. My first recommendation is Mexico City. You’ll be able to get cheap flights from Dallas, and the weather there in November is very nice and dry. Honestly, the whole huge city center is as nice as any large Texas city, and the architecture is far more interesting. You can even visit some pyramids just a bit outside of town. Before I went I assumed Mexico City would look run-down like many border towns, but it’s actually very fancy.
Thank you very much Roger. I truly value your insight and am taking into consideration everything you’ve noted above. I’m going to check out the link you posted as well. That just reassured me that Bali would be great during that period. I’m thinking principally of staying in Ubud, Sanur or Seminyak for the type of trip I have in mind which is equal parts warm weather, walking/discovering, culture and some beach life. I’d love to visit Thailand but it’s just not the right time. At this point, I’m more intrigued by all of the many, still remote islands of Philippines than the chaotic lifestyle in Thailand. Perhaps, that’s just me still reeling from my trip to India a few months ago.

Even cheaper than that is Cartagena, although the flight would probably be a bit more expensive. Cartagena has a gorgeous walled colonial Old City filled with cool hotels, shops, and restaurants, and it’s a 10-minute cheap taxi ride to a strip of beachfront hotels in a modern neighborhood. It helps if you know Spanish in both places, but Playa del Carmen has so many English speakers that it’s easy to get by on that alone. Those are my best picks in our region for inexpensive places that are fun with a lot to offer a solo traveler or small group. Let me know if you have any questions. -Roger
On Monday morning we arrived at our hotel, dropped our stuff in the room, and headed out to our first stop. We had a light breakfast at home, and mine consisted of a fatty coffee and 2 pieces of bacon. So we were all pretty hungry by around 1 pm. We headed to one of the food joints nearby, and I found a southwest grilled chicken salad (Meal 1) on their menu. After asking them to hold the black bean relish and sugary dressing, I ended up with a decent sized bowl of salad mix topped with half a grilled chicken breast and a good-sized scoop of chopped avocado. I topped it off with salt, pepper, and a packet of blue cheese dressing.
Most hotels these days include at least a small refrigerator, and some even include a full kitchen and stove. This is great because it allows you to shop locally for some fresh food options. Search online for nearby farmer’s markets or grocery stores and see if you can pick up some local meats or fresh veggies to have in your room. This is more likely to be an option in the warmer months.
I a from India, Me and and wife plan to go for a quick 4-5 days holiday with an infant who is just 6 mpnths old. so we cannot take long flights, we cannot go to places which are very crowded and hustling and bustling. We want a relaxed holiday where we can take time out and enjoy in true sense. Cannot go to a very cold plave aginst with an infant wont be right. We have been to Thailand( phi phi and kho samui) dubai, bali, singapore, sri lanka already.
Actually, all of my best suggestions for those things are in the article above. One challenge you’ll have is that all popular tropical destinations have their peak weeks at the end of December because so many people in cold areas have that time off. So flights to Central or South America are going to be fairly expensive, although buying soon can help. For hiking and views I think Costa Rica could be a good choice, or Nicaragua. You could also go to Bariloche in Argentina, though it’s probably not worth going all that way unless you were also going to spend some time in Buenos Aires and such.
Keep Snacks Handy When You are Out – This was my snack stash for Disney World. I had Macadamia Nuts, Walnuts, Pecans, and low carb bars. I made sure to chill the water bottles in the freezer beforehand so that as they thawed throughout the day, we had cold water. When hunger hit, instead of falling to temptation, I just grabbed my bag of snacks before I got HANGRY. Doing so made it so much easier to make keto/low carb choices at mealtime. I kept my snacks simple because we already had enough to bring with us (if you have a baby and a toddler you know what I mean). I saw lots of people with small coolers who were snacking on fresh veggies and deli meats, but, again, my goal was easy breezy. You can find a great list of Keto/Low Carb Snack ideas here for inspiration if you prefer a variety.

Santa Barbara has earned its nickname, “The American Riviera,” with its stunning coastline, lush landscapes, cafes, restaurants, and year-round Mediterranean-like weather. Sandy beaches invite sunbathers, and for those interested in more activity, there’s biking, paddle boarding, surfing, and kayaking. In the heart of Santa Barbara County wine country, the city presents more than two dozen downtown tasting rooms on its “Urban Wine Trail.” The artsy “Funk Zone,” with a variety of cleverly designed eateries and shops, is just blocks from the beach. The community is recovering from devastating fires and mudslides, and its resilience is apparent with new hotels, restaurants, and attractions. The Montecito neighborhood, particularly hard hit by the tragic events, is home to the recently renovated Montecito Inn and its new dining venues, Phillip Frankland Lee's The Monarch, and the suave Chaplin’s Martini Bar, commemorating Charlie Chaplin, one of the hotel’s original owners when it was built in 1928. The elegant oceanfront Four Seasons Resort The Biltmore Santa Barbara offers a luxurious spa and views of Butterfly Beach. Less than two hours north of Los Angeles, Santa Barbara celebrates the holiday season with colorful lights, a Holiday Parade (Dec. 7), Harbor Boat Parade with fireworks (Dec. 16), European-style Christmas market, and the traditional "Nutcracker Suite" at the Granada Theater.
Always happy to hear that people find this useful. If you are looking for a driving holiday with warm weather in December I think you’ve already narrowed down the best choices. New Zealand will be ideal, although maybe not for more than two weeks or so. As you might know, the South Island is more scenic than the North, but the North has many great things to see and do as well.

In colder weather it’s probably better to focus on the great cities rather than places more known for scenery and outdoor activities. If your budget is generous then my top choice would be London, Paris, and Amsterdam. You could fly into any of those and then visit the others by high-speed train. The train that connects London to Paris and Amsterdam is called the Eurostar, and the earlier you buy your tickets the cheaper they will be. Paris and Amsterdam are linked by normal high-speed trains, which are also cheapest when you buy early. Speaking of that, your dates are prime travel dates over the Christmas holidays so the airfares will be kind of expensive and they will only go up from here. In other words, buy as soon as you can.

“Winter in Eastern Canada” might sound more like a 19th-century prison sentence than it does a pleasant vacation, but Quebec City does the cold better than anywhere in North America. Blanketed in snow, QC looks like the world’s most elaborately constructed Christmas village. The cobblestone streets in Old Quebec densely packed with storefronts beckoning you to come in for hot food and baked goods, and boisterous bars overflow with a cacophony of Quebecoise. In December the streets are draped with Christmas wreaths and populated with carolers, plus there’s an authentic German Christmas market -- a true novelty in a city so overwhelmingly French.
Montreal’s oldest Catholic Church, dating to 1656, includes stained glass that chronicles the history of the city. The city’s Parisian-style historic district, with cultural landmarks, boutiques, cafes, and restaurants, can be toured in a horse-drawn carriage for the full vintage effect. La Grande Degustation de Montreal (Nov. 2-3) attracts wine producers, distillers, and brewers from around the world. Montreal also hosts the 24th-annual French Language Film Festival (Nov. 1-11) featuring contemporary films from around the world subtitled in English. When it’s cold, visitors can head to the underground city, a network of tunnels, corridors, and plazas with more than 1,000 retailers and restaurants. The Montreal Tower Observatory, the world’s tallest inclined tower, provides breathtaking views of the city, the Laurentian Mountains, and St. Lawrence River Valley.
Even though November is one of the busy months in Pokhara, they've built so many new hotels in the past few years that finding a room – even at a decent price – should always be possible. The high-season rates are still very cheap by almost anyone else's standards, and food and drinks are always very affordable, but if you look around a bit you'll be able to do even better.
My first thought was Goa, which you say you’ve been to before, but maybe you don’t realize that there are about 20 different beach areas that are different from one another in terms of vibe and types of visitors? Personally, I found that Anjuna and Vagator were both kind of mellow but also busy enough and easy to meet other people. But if you don’t like those, there are many different beaches in the south, which I’ve heard are also great and draw different groups. It’s something to think about because it doesn’t get much cheaper than Goa for beaches anywhere in the world. -Roger
Over in the Americas, meanwhile, it’s all about downhill thrills. Mt Hood, an 11,250ft (3429m) stratovolcano in Oregon’s Cascade Range, has North America’s longest ski season, with good quality powder dumps arriving in earnest at the beginning of November (before the real ski crowds descend). Runs are split fairly evenly between grades, making it a great spot for skiers of all abilities. Those looking to really ramp up the thrill factor, however, should head south to Nicaragua, where volcano boarding – tobogganing down their slopes – provides a one-of-a-kind adrenaline rush.

Thanks for all of this Roger! It looks like in the comments you mention Portugal a couple times and I wanted your opinion – we’re looking at the first two weeks and probably focusing on Lisbon to Porto (since we know it will be too cold to do the beaches in the south). While Portugal seems to be highly recommended, I keep seeing conflicting information about November being rainy – we definitely don’t want to spend 2 weeks in the rain but in your experience what are the chances of that? Thank you!!


Early December is the end of the rainy season in those areas. The storms tend to be short by that time, but still you will probably get a few quick downpours a week. I’m not an expert on getting around in the Philippines, though I do know that it’s rarely fast or easy. If you want a place to relax then Boracay Island might be the best. Sorry I couldn’t be of more help. -Roger
I haven’t followed the Zika list, but I do understand the concern. Since you aren’t big beach people, you might just bring jackets and go to a more romantic city like Paris, and then maybe down to Nice for part of the trip and something a bit different. I’m not sure if this is helping, but if you have any questions about any of this I’m happy to keep trying. -Roger
Since flights to Mexico City from the US and Canada are usually quite cheap this time of year as well, this could be a perfect short cultural holiday. This city has great shopping, dining, and nightlife, and the central historic and tourist districts are far safer than most people would expect. There are ruins just out of town as well, so a bit of everything is available.
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