The second option you have is food trucks – although you really have to be weary on this one. Don’t be afraid to ask them what the ingredients are, as the food is made fresh and they’re usually proud to tell you what’s in their food. Luckily, we encountered a Paleo food truck while in Portland called Cultured Caveman (pictured below) that served some keto friendly items.
I’ve only been to Norway in the summer and I’ve not gone skiing in Europe, so I can’t be of my help with those. Pretty much everyone who comes to this article (and this site) for December recommendations is looking for tropical destinations, so that’s what I’ve mostly provided. Sorry I couldn’t be of more help, and feel free to ask more questions if you have them. -Roger
Portugal does have one of Europe’s best autumn climates, but as you’ve noticed November can be a bit rainy. That said, in my experience it rarely rains for long periods in that part of Europe so I think it’s very unlikely that a big part of your trip would be “rained out.” Also those cities have lots of great indoor attractions so if you see that it’s supposed to be clear in the morning and drizzly in the afternoon, you can plan to explore neighborhoods in the morning and plan to visit a museum or castle in the afternoon. It’s a bit of a crap-shoot and generally Portugal has nicer weather than most of the rest of Europe at any given time. I hope this helps. -Roger
It can still be rainy in Belize in November, so it’s not an ideal time to visit. I quite like Belize and there is a lot to do there, including of course the second largest coral reef in the world. You can also head over the Guatemala border to visit Tikal and even down to Antigua for something different. You don’t get many great beaches there, but aside from that it is great.
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Thank you. If you are looking for an all-inclusive or large resort hotel on a beach, you can’t do any better than Punta Cana for value and facilities. You can also find really nice resorts in the general Cancun area, and the flight would probably be cheaper, but the nightly rate would be quite a bit more. Both have really nice beaches, although with Cancun you have to pay attention to the specific location because not every resort is on a wide stretch of sand.
In Vietnam every hotel will have a “tours desk” that will happily book a tour or visit to any local sight imaginable. There are also dozens of independent travel agencies around booking these same tours, but some of them are better than others. I prefer to book tours through my hotel, even if it costs a bit more, because it helps them and they have a strong incentive for you to be happy with the tour. If a hotel would consistently book guests on tours that the guests felt were rip-offs, that would be in the reviews and they would lose future business. More expensive hotels tend to charge more for the same tours, but things in Vietnam are so cheap that it’s not worth worrying about. And you might get a better pick-up at the nicer hotels as well.
For anyone considering a multi-destination South American trip in November, Santiago should definitely be looked at. The daytime temperatures should be pleasant and warm, and it's bone-dry all summer, so it's a great combination. Hotels in Santiago don't have their peak price season until New Year's, so in November you'll easily be able to find a very good rate at one of the nicer places.

My other two suggestions are San Juan, Puerto Rico and Cartagena, Colombia. Both cities have really wonderful colonial districts and modern resort districts nearby. San Juan is more expensive, but still reasonable, and it has far better beaches. Both have a bit of rain in November, but it tends to come and go quickly. You’ll get similar rainstorms in most of the Caribbean in November, so it’s a bit tricky. I hope this helps. If you had something else in mind let me know and I’ll try again. -Roger
If you are really only going for 4 or 5 days you only have time to visit one or maybe two cities anyway. I’d say that Lisbon would be ideal and you’d have time also for a short visit to Porto or the Algarve in the south, or at least the historic small town of Sintra, which is near Lisbon. Lisbon has fantastic weather for Europe and it’s a lovely city with plenty to see and do.
Bali, which is just south of the equator, would be a good choice in November. It does rain a bit that month, but they are summer storms that tend to only last 30 minutes or so. It’s a wonderful island with great prices on most things, including massages. The complicated thing about Bali is that the main tourist areas of Kuta, Legian, and Seminyak are now so crowded that they can be unpleasant. I spent a month there again earlier this year, and I don’t think I’ll go back to that part of the island.
If you are open to Africa you should consider Morocco. It will be a bit chilly in December, but still warm enough to enjoy everything. The culture there is fascinating and it’s also very tourist-friendly and safe. I think it would be cheaper for you to fly to Morocco than to the Americas, and the daily costs are very reasonable as well. Those should give you some things to think about, and feel free to follow up if you have other questions.
Orlando’s theme parks are a major draw for families (and big kids, too!), but this iconic experience doesn’t necessarily come cheap. During the pre-Christmas November lull, however, hotels often offer attractive discounted rates, meaning potential savings and – more importantly for the kids – less time spent standing in line. Those looking for a more alternative American adventure should consider the island of Puerto Rico in November. While there’s a chance of rain (but a greater chance of balmy beach-lounging days), the out-of-season discounts are as appetising as the island’s take on Thanksgiving dinner: turkey stuffed with mashed plantain.
As a male who usually travels solo, I’m not sure I’m the best source of advice for solo female tips. There are hundreds of travel blogs run by solo female travelers, and if you Google some specific topics that you are curious about, I’m sure you’ll find some great information. Generally speaking, the females tend to say that traveling solo is far easier and less threatening than they had feared.
I’ll be happy to try. First off, if you are doing the actual Inca Trail hike, you’ll need 4 days for that plus another couple of days in Cusco to get acclimated. So really that whole part of your trip would be a week. Also, to get to Cusco you pretty much have to go through Lima, and it’s also an interesting city so I’d recommend probably 2 nights there. If you don’t do the Inca Trail and take the train instead, you could save 3 days in Cusco.
In Cambodia the best place by far is the Angkor Wat temples just outside of Siem Reap. Siem Reap itself is a nice town with plenty to see and do, but 3 or maybe 4 days should be enough. Otherwise you have Phnom Penh, which isn’t too special, or Sihanoukville, which is a pleasant beach town that doesn’t really match up to most of what you are used to in the Philippines.
Southeast Asia is easier to deal with, and there are cheap flights connecting in the Middle East and landing in Bangkok, Kuala Lumpur, and Singapore. Each of those is a very interesting city, and there are many smaller places to go in the same region. In Malaysia there is Penang and Melaka. In Thailand there is Chiang Mai and quite a few others in that area. In Laos you can visit Luang Prabang, which sounds like it could be a winner for you. And there is also Siem Reap, which is home to the amazing Angkor Wat temple complex.
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